Saddle-up Cow-bloggers

Ar Cosa in Airde ©agsmaoineamh.com

Ar Cosa in Airde ©agsmaoineamh.com

Words are amazing. In an instant they can conjure up the warm, vibrant scenes of a moroccan market on a grey, dull day, stuck in front of a computer screen.

Words saddle-up and enter the sensorial corrals of the mind, spinning tiny lasso’s above their heads. The word rose, shouts yee-hah!  heading straight for a memory from two summers ago; a delicate pink mass of petals you filtered and posted on Instagram. The flowers’ imposing, floral scent, made you woozy; and now as you read this, its’ sweetness, again fills your nostrils.

So too the word, dog poop. Now there’s a few memories to rope in. The family mystery of who tread in it after a walk in the park. The dawning realisation of its’ presence when it gives way in a pile of autumn leaves. The squelch and release of a potent, eye watering, carnivorous stench.

Bet you’re looking for a metaphorical grass verge to wipe your shoes on now, I know I am.

So what’s my dilemma? Well the question is; would this wild west spectacular have been better utilised in a poem or work of fiction? Does maintaining a blog keep me from ‘proper’ writing?

I’m on the fence on this one. Looking in at my memories sending up clouds of dust like wild mustangs.

I can’t keep them in there forever, a corral is only temporary. So do I load them up onto my blog?

Or open the gate and set them free on a foolscap prairie?

A Short Story About Apples & Oranges

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Apples & Oranges

There once was a girl with a thing for fruit.

She also liked the internet.

These were her two passions in life.

She would often blog late into the night with her teeth imbedded in a pink lady, or breakfast with her smart phone while removing the tantalizing peel of an orange.

One evening, while perusing the internet, a strange thing came to her attention. She stopped typing, there was silence, reading and head scratching. She broke the silence with some expletive bleating, which I will not repeat here before attacking the keyboard more frenetic than ever.

The girl typed late into the night and into the next morning. This was repeated for four days. She eventually clicked the blue publish post button in the corner of the screen. Her post was entitled; ‘Why Apples & Oranges Should Remain Different’, with the subtitle; ‘ why new government proposals to amalgamate apples and oranges is all wrong.’

Over the next few days it proved to be her most popular post. Many followers left comments and shared it. Debates, arguments of various intelligence and discussion led to many theories on the governments’ motives.  Links to articles claimed the government minister pushing the oranples policy, as it had become known, hadn’t eaten an apple or an orange since 1988.

Days passed, the girl was distracted, she had forgotten to buy orange juice. On her way home in the car she was about to change the radio station when she recognized the voice being interviewed and paused. It was the minister. She listened intently. Arriving home, she remained in the car until the interview concluded. It was awful; he had come out on top, running circles around the seasoned interviewer, denying the government had even considered amalgamating apples and oranges.

The girl realized her best post ever from the previous week was now redundant. What she predicted hadn’t come to pass, so she concluded her argument must have been flawed.

The boy who’s job it was to monitor social media for the government got his contract renewed.